Results tagged ‘ Kendrick ’

I survived cancer and the D-backs 5K run

PHOENIX — I ran the D-backs first annual cancer 5K through the streets of downtown Phoenix on Saturday morning in a surprising 49 minutes, 48 seconds.

Considering that I usually average 18-minute miles, that’s pretty good for me.

I then took part in the weenie 1K family fun walk with my friend, Joey Reaves, and his wife, Lynne, who helped coordinate the event with the D-backs for St. Joseph’s Hospital. Joey, a prostate cancer survivor, is a former foreign correspondent and sportswriter par excellence, who now works for the Dodgers. Proof positive that cancer knows no affiliations nor boundaries.

As a two-time colon cancer survivor, I ran on Saturday for myself and some of my friends who are currently battling different forms of cancer. Michael Weiner and Juan Rodriguez are struggling with very virulent forms of brain cancer. Jim Gintonio has lung cancer.

Derrick Hall and Ken Kendrick in the D- backs hierarchy are also prostrate cancer survivors.

Pray for them. Think good thoughts for them. Good health and god bless them all along with the multitudes suffering from this disease. I honored their names by scribbling them around the placard boasting my race No. 38.

More than 3 1/2 years ago, I had a second bout with colon cancer when it jumped into my lung. I had surgery to bisect the upper lobe of my left lung to remove a tumor about the size of my finger tip. Two days after the surgery doctors had me on a tread mill. They wanted me to start by walking eight minutes twice a day with a goal of steadily rebuilding breathing capacity. Two weeks later I surpassed 30 minutes twice a day.

It’s an old cliche, but a truism: When there’s a will, there’s a way.

I’ve always been over weight, but I’ve always worked out. I never smoked. Now I no longer drink alcohol. In the last year I lost 60 pounds and I’ve kept almost all of that off.

The net result: In the last week I’ve had three light jogs of three miles or more. All that with a bisected lung. I’m in better shape now than before I had cancer. I’m lucky. I’m fortunate. But it’s been a lot of hard work. As the old joke goes, I bought the lottery ticket. No one could do that for me.

Out on the streets this morning I was passed by most of the younger and faster runners who left me in the dust right away. Guys wheeling baby carriages with one hand were rolling right by me. Women running backwards. Children walking. About a mile or so in I hit a comfortable pace. I started passing the people out for a stroll who were even slower than me.

The day started unusually gray and cold for the desert. Suddenly, the sky broke and the sun came out, bringing warmth along with it. I sprinted to the finish line and ran into D-backs great Luis Gonzalez. He had finished just in front me. Hundreds of people finished behind me.

If we can do it, you can. Early detection. Positive state of mind. Put in the work. There’s your own No. 38 and a medal for finishing at the end of the rainbow.

20130209-105046.jpg

D-backs need quality starter, closer. That’s it!

PHOENIX — Ken Kendrick, the D-backs managing general partner, said this week in the wake of the club’s 10-game losing streak, that major changes are in the offing for the Major League roster.

“When the team is playing as badly as this team is…you really need to look very broadly at everything and try to objectively determine what kind of changes you really want to make,” he said.

The current roster as it stands is quite adequate except in two areas: The D-backs need a quality starting pitcher and reliable closer. That’s it. Both holes are the residue of organizational decisions that shouldn’t be blamed on anybody.

In this space I’ve said before that the decision to trade Jose Valverde after the close of the 2007 season, mostly for financial reasons, started a domino affect on the bullpen that the D-backs are still feeling to this day. The D-backs lost Valverde’s 47 saves in ’07 and have yet to find anyone who can replace them. They saved 39 games in ’08, a falloff of eight from Valverde’s numbers a year
before, and finished two games out. They saved 36 games last year, 10 so far this year — 11 blown.

Brandon Webb hurt his shoulder at the outset of the 2009 season, although there was ample evidence in September of ’08 that the problem was ruminating.  He hasn’t pitched since. After shoulder surgery last August, the D-backs made a decision to exercise an $8.5 million option on Webb for this season, hoping he would return to his former Cy Young award-winning form. When he couldn’t even throw, there was no “Plan B.” Webb won 22 games in ’08. With a patchwork quilt of starters trying to fill that slot, the D-backs haven’t even come close in each of the last two seasons.

Certainly there have been other mistakes: The contract to Eric Byrnes, since released and out of baseball, that the D-backs are still paying. The failure to come to terms with second baseman Orlando Hudson, causing another round robin of free-agent signees and utility players at that key position.

The D-backs have a core of good young players that should remain untouched — Dan Haren, Edwin Jackson, Conor Jackson, Justin Upton, Mark Reynolds, Miguel Montero and Ian Kennedy. But they need a top starter and a closer. You can’t win, especially in the NL West, without that.

  

Follow

Get every new post delivered to your Inbox.